Friday, January 07, 2005

Breaking through the walls of emotion...

Have to say I agree with these 2 spiked articles: "How we deal with disasters" and On the length of silences. The British, it must be said, have developed a very in-apt, very arrogant process of dealing with very sad events, to the point where the overbearing imposition of sympathy makes me lose all sense of the original tragedy. In such times, it becomes ever more important to hold on to what's real, and not let ourselves be carried off on waves of perceived guilt.

3 comments:

William said...

Yeah... but as criticism it's a bit rich coming from an American. And I'm not anti-yank, but for about six months after 9/11 friends of mine in NY said they felt they got looks if they DIDN'T put a stars and stripes on their cars. And even discussing Palestine was seen as unpatriotic. Mass collective emotion is part of the modern world alongside more awful things like Heat magazine and people saying "my bad".
singingslowly.ebloggy.com

Scribe said...

Hi William :) I think your comment should be "as criticism it would be a bit rich coming from an American." Spiked is based in London, and I've definitely never lived anywhere other than south of London. Any musings on the state of the British population therefore suffer from first-hand experience <g>.

Scribe said...

Oh, on the subject of "mass-collective emotion" (tidal emotion?), I wonder if it has anything to do with the psychological usurping of our desires by faceless corporates who want us to buy stuff. Somewhere, under all that gunk that people wear to show what kind of person they are, maybe they're acutely aware of how lacking they actually are. Maybe they over-compensate for this when the media says they're allowed to, i.e. when it's so obvious something's tragic that not showing emotion is "obviously" inhuman and uncaring. At this point, enter "keeping up with the Joneses" syndrome to elicit an ever-increasing circle of guilt-driven feeling.

People don't know what they want any more.