Friday, November 14, 2008

I, he, you, he, you, me, we, are all together.

Originally tweeted about this, but I'm sufficiently, um, riled up (?) to turn it into a blog post. The Guardian, purveyor of all things hideously hypocritical and doublethinkish (although their crosswords rock, and I don't mean the namby-pamby Quick Crossword for people with girly hangovers), pick up on a debate at the Earthwatch institute, along with accompanying poll in which you get to vote for the most invaluable species.

Now, I like bees, but I also like mushrooms, and I also like monkeys and shit, AND THIS IS WHY THE WHOLE THING IS SILLY LOOK HOW ANGRY I AM I'M USING CAPS (but not caps lock, you'll notice).

This is not a game. This is not a TV show where you get to choose whichever crap singer of the week has the most heart-wrenching sob-story-cum-background-music. (Yes, Newsround, I'm looking at you.) This is nature, this is an eco-system. This is not eco-bits-and-bobs that happen to share the same eco-space. This is not a fancy of choosing, by way of strange analogy, which bodily organ would you like to not remove thank you?

We cannot just save the cute things and leave the ugly and the terrifying to die. We cannot pick and choose the world we want because we do not exist outside the world. We cannot survive if continue seeing species as separate, isolated "miracles" in constant competition against each other and against the "environment". Animals are the environment. The environment are animal.

What can we do, though?

For starters, we can stop pretending that we can fix the world by ourselves; that all the "poor, suffering creatures" without brains need is our protection from a world they no longer understand, a world "created" by us.

We can get over our giant societal ego. We can stop pretending the world's fate is in our hands like the end of some CGI-infested Hollywoord trilogy epic. We can understand that humility, not profit, is key to understanding what it is we need to do to become sustainable. We can choose NOT to act - not to consume, not to buy, not to waste - as a viable alternative. We can take what we need and leave plenty behind. We can stop being afraid that if we stop for a moment, we ourselves will be left behind.

For once, we can look around us. We can see the world with our eyes and sense it with our instinct, instead of trying to grapple with it through those gloves of 'evidence' and 'analysis' that really need little holes in the end of the fingers to stop us being cut off from all useful sensitivity.

We can see the world - life, our bodies, our thoughts, our emotions - as inter-dependent, as one big relationship that has no beginning and no end, no cause and no effect. Only simple, perfect cauffect.

1 comment:

Nikki said...

Not a game? Not a tv show? Were you not watching a couple of years ago when... "Millions of viewers tuned in to ITV1 on Saturday 16 December to see the Bengal tiger voted the 'winner' of Extinct!" ?

( From http://extinct.wwf.org.uk/ )